In late 2014, (? Check ?) and by then having listened to Brian Eno’s Thursday Afternoon on repeat for several months if not years, I started getting more engaged in the ideas behind the music of Eno, Steve Reich, John Adams etc, and started wondering how mundane this idea of loop and repetition could get before it's simply uninteresting, and whether it would translate to a visual form - ie. looping an image devoid of specific meaning or content to see whether it functioned similarly as a blank space into which mental wanderings have a place to exist.

I'd walked past the priest's house next door to a catholic church on the way to the swimming pool most days and been fascinated by something I couldn't quite put my finger on, but I'd always look. So this became a possible vehicle for exploring that idea. By photographing it daily in all its mundanity would it become interesting? In order to photograph I'd need a camera which meant that I'd need a locker (while swimming) so why not get all repetitious about a whole bunch of stuff - always use locker number 19, and always get changed in cubicle number 17. Both arbitrary but then so is the picture so why not? Picture, cubicle, locker, repeat. I did it for a year or so. My brother pointed out that these are both prime numbers so if one or other were occupied I should find the next available prime and use that one. I thought that might start taking up too much of the day.

In the middle of this year Colin - whose relentless routine was the starting point for these studies - succumbed to the cancer he'd known about since his diagnosis in 2013. I was lucky to be able to spend the last three weeks of his life in Devon, both to be with him and to support my mother as best I could. As a consequence there's a big time gap in the middle of the summer where I wasn't able to photograph the house. He would not have been impressed by this discrepancy (that's nonsense actually but he'd have revelled in being appalled)!

Does it work? I've no idea but I kind of like the way it looks, and I wonder what world lingers behind those impermeable net curtains.
Study #3: House
2015 / 42 photographs


Study #3: House
2015 / 42 photographs